We have teamed up with the Great British Cookbook to provide you with a ‘Tuesday Treat’ to get you in the mood for our Big Bake festivals that are taking place at Markeaton Park (17th/18th June) and Newstead Abbey (26th/27th/28th August).

We will choose 1 dessert from The Great British Cookbook each week and share the recipe with you lucky lot! If you give it a try, send us your images and we’ll share the attempts, good, bad and indifferent, on our Facebook page!

Week One – Corrigan’s of Mayfair – Honey & Stout Tart.

For our first recipe, we are visiting ‘Corrigan’s of Mayfair’. 

Ingredients

250g Plain flour

Pinch of salt

125g Cutter, cut intosmall cubes, and somemore for greasing

50g Caster sugar

3 Eggs (one of them
beaten, for eggwash)

Cream to serve

Filling

4 Bramley apples

330ml bottle of Stout, such as Guinness

200g Rolled oats

250g Golden syrup

250g Honey

250g Stale breadcrumbs

6 Eggs, beaten

4tsp Lemon juice

Zest of 1 lemon and 1 orange

Method

Start by making the pastry. In a bowl, combine the flour and the salt, then rub in the butter with your fingers; if you do it properly the mixture will look like fine breadcrumbs. Add the sugar and mix in well. Then, add the beaten eggs a little at a time and work it together until you have a dough. Alternatively, you can use a food processor in which case put the flour, salt, butter and sugar into the blender and pulse until you get the fine breadcrumbs texture.

Add the egg mixture and pulse until they are combined. Then, turn it out onto a work surface or into a bowl and mould into a ball. It is important not to work the dough anymore than it takes to form a ball.

Cover the pastry with cling film and chill in the fridge for about 20 minutes to make it easier to roll. And chill in the fridge for about 20 minutes, which will make it easier to roll.

Pre-heat the oven to 150C/gas mark 2 and prepare a 25cm loose-bottomed flan tin by greasing it with a little butter.

Roll out the pastry on a floured surface until it forms a circle about 5cm bigger than your tart tin. Roll the pastry loosely around your rolling pin, then drape it carefully over the tin and press it gently in. Trim off the excess pastry with a knife.

Now you need to bake the pastry case ‘blind’ by lining it with greaseproof paper, over which you scatter some dried beans (or ceramic ‘beans’) which will stop the pastry from rising too much. Bake for about 45 minutes until the pastry is pale golden, then remove and turn the oven up to 180C/gas mark 4.

Don’t delay. Remove the greaseproof paper right away and while the pastry case is still hot, brush it generously with eggwash to seal it. Even if the pastry seems to crack a little as it cools, the eggwash should keep it pretty well sealed.

Pour the stout into a saucepan with the peeled and grated apples and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and let the volume of the liquid reduce by about half. The apple will go brown, but that’s the way it’s meant to be. Take off the heat and allow it to cool.

When the stout and apple mixture is cool, add the other filling ingredients and mix thoroughly. Then pour into the pastry case and bake in the oven for 20-25 minutes until set.

Preheat the oven to 150 degrees Celsius/ gas 2. Have ready a 25 cm, loose-bottomed flat in, greased with a little butter. On a floured surface, roll out the pastry into a circle about 5 cm bigger than your tart tin. Roll the pastry loosely round your rolling pin, then drape it over the in and gently press it in. Trim carefully around the edge with a knife. To bake ‘blind’, line the pastry with greaseproof paper and scatter over a layer of dried beans and brush (or ceramic baking beans)- this will stop the pastry from rising up. Bake in the oven for about 45 minutes until pale and golden, then remove and turn up the oven to 180 degrees/ gas 4.

Immediately after taking the tart tin out of the oven, remove the greaseproof paper and beans and brush the whole of the inside of the pastry case with egg wash. This will seal it and prevent it from cracking as it cools- It may still crack a little, but don’t worry. Peel and grate the apples. Pour the stout into a saucepan, add the apple, bring to the boil, then turn down the heat and let the liquid reduce by about half. The apple will go brown but its natural. Take off the heat and allow to cool until just warm.

Serve with cream.


You can find more fantastic recipes by purchasing your copy of The Great British Cookbook by clicking here. All proceeds from the book go to Macmillan Cancer Support and Hospitality Action

We'll look forward to seeing your attempts!